LANDSCAPING TIPS FOR
AFTER THE STORM 
from Art That Grows

All of us at Art That Grows hope each of you made it through our strangely long winter storm with minimal inconveniences. We all survived and are reviewing how landscaping fared with the brutal north wind and deep cold temperatures. After visiting several properties, here are our tips and thoughts about what to do next:

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  1. Don't trim (most) anything back yet. Many plants we’ve reviewed this week (February 26, 2021) have some type of damage, but we are still in winter when plants are in a dormant state. We recommend waiting another six weeks or so before removing dead items from most plants. This will give the plants a chance to begin the new growth process, or let us know if they survived. I know many plants look terrible right now, but resist the urge to correct that until we get well into Spring. Most plants we use are zoned for more Northern climates and should make it through.

  2. OK to trim these plants soon. There are a few plants that can be trimmed in early March and beyond: liriope (monkey grass), holly ferns, aspidistra, and mondo grass, primarily. It may be a good year to trim liriope back to the crown, if it has been planted at least a year, and let it produce all new growth. Holly ferns and aspidistra should have the burned brown or frayed leaves pick-pruned from the plant. Do not crown the entire plant and wait until you see new growth before trimming. Trim any dead leaves out of mondo grass.

  3. Pre-emergent. Now is a good time to put down pre-emergent for killing or halting any new weed growth. Isn’t it funny that the only real green we saw once the snow melted was weeds? Those can be addressed now with a pre-emergent or broad spectrum weed killer.

  4. Fertilizing. Hold off on any fertilization for the time being. We want the natural Spring growth process to begin without our assistance before fertilizing lawns or plants. Fertilizing can begin the third week of March. This will also give any weed killers a chance to do their job, and not get fertilized to grow. Our recommendation for fertilizing is to use Ironite and an organic fertilizer (Milorganite, if available). These can be purchased at any home and garden store.. 

  5. We are available to answer your questions or to assist in the review of plants and any accompanying damage.

Let us know if we can help you and let's all hope the upcoming warm weather comes sooner rather than later! Email Mark@ArtThatGrows.com or call to Art That Grows at 214-987-0006.